Sunday, 6 October 2013

Stories on glass...


 ... the stained glass windows from Canterbury Cathedral, the new Millennium window in Durham Cathedral then the new: a book made of glass ...
 
Durham Cathedral Millennium Window
c/o Doc Brown's site - photos of the NE

The unlikely one – nine books of glass ... by Olafur Eliasson, an Icelandic-Danish artist, who founded the Institute for Spatial Experiments.  


He brought the sun to London, waterfalls to New York City and a rainbow to see the world through at Aarhus, Denmark ...


I saw an excerpt on Channel 4 news, and hope that you can all get to see the video and it’s not just for the British market: it blew my mind ...

 
Two of Eliasson's glass books
c/o Channel 4 News site

... glass pages each nearly a metre high, twelve per book, hand-blown by some of the last European craftsmen blowing glass this way ... what vision ...



Eliasson says: “I love books, but I’m not afraid of that.  In my experience, the printed book has been taking on its own pride.  The kind of paper used matters, typography matters, books are books again.”


Glass pages c/o Channel 4 News
As for his glass books with some pages cut by concentric circles: “I’ve cut holes in them, but it’s not a void.  Looking through the holes, you’re reading the page you’re about to read soon, and it’s about what is about to happen and what has happened.


“When you read a great novel, at the moment the novel starts to read you, you think ‘I know that feeling’.  I’m interested in the moment when the narrative becomes a producer of reality.

 
Further information in Vimeo -
with a video too: c/o Vimeo site

These light filled glass books look different depending on the time of day, where the light that reaches them, where the “reader” stands, what’s reflected on them.



Eliasson in the video says ... “the thing is a great novel, or great book, or great work of art ... shows there is a value where we have forgotten to look for one ...


Leather bound glass books ... how do you move them when they are distributed to the nine museums?!


Canterbury Cathedral - the 12th C 'Choir'

12th century Canterbury Cathedral stained glass artworks – how and why are these moved from their setting fifty feet up (17 metres) in the windows of perhaps the most famous Christian Cathedral in the world – to Los Angeles?


I could say ‘of all places’ – but the answer lies in the name of the Museum – the J Paul Getty Museum ... the windows are the highlight of an exhibition “Canterbury and St Albans: Treasures from Church and Cloister” open until 2nd February 2014 ...


... when they will travel once again to the Cloisters Museum and Gardens in New York City for a Spring showing.

 
Jared: detail - c/o Getty
Museum - and
photographer Robert
Greschoff c/o
Canterbury Cathedral
These beautiful four-foot panels of stained glass – incredible masterpieces of medieval English art that have graced the storied magnificent Cathedral for more than eight centuries ...


... will be an unprecedented and extraordinary opportunity to experience the majesty and romance of Canterbury by being able to see these windows in all their glory up close.


The windows depict imposing, near life-sized patriarchs of the Old Testament, including Noah and Abraham, from a series representing the Ancestors of Christ.


Alongside the windows ... the St Albans Psalter (circa 1130) is also on loan from the Cathedral Library in Hildesheim, Germany.


David as Musician (detail) 1120-1130
at the J Paul Getty Museum, LA
Tempura and Gold on parchment
c/o Hildesheim Library
Both exhibits of these works of art are only possible because of conservation projects – to the sandstone fabric of Canterbury Cathedral and its windows, to rebinding the Psalter, which has been unbound for a facsimile project, and will need to be restored.


Together these two bodies of works offer visitors an unprecedented chance to study the innovations of 12th century English painting on a monumental and miniature scale ...


... the fully modelled and articulated figures, full resolution colours and then the elaborately patterned border decorations that characterise English Romanesque art.


To travel – the windows were wrapped, rewrapped, surrounded by foam, boxed, then wrapped, rewrapped, surrounded by foam, boxed – well you get the idea ...


... they arrived safely – but the unknown part ... did they fly (were they flown?!) ... or did they go by sea ... did they go individually or all together at once ... so far so good – the Getty Museum is thrilled with their catch!


 
The top of the window showing us
St Cuthbert's journey c/o Doc Brown's site
Then our third story – the Millennium Window in Durham Cathedral ... tells the story of St Cuthbert (c 634 – 687) from his humble beginnings ... to his Bishopric on Lindisfarne, the pilgrimage with his body, before his ultimate enshrinement in Durham.


The lower panels reflect the local industries ... glass blowing, ship building, chemicals and car manufacturing ...

 
The lower panels depicting Durham's more recent
history - c/o Doc Brown's site
... the link to shipping, the iconic Tyne Bridge, railway engineering (including Stephenson’s 1825 ‘Locomotion’) and coal mining, although this no longer occurs in Co Durham.


The lower panels show a computer and printout; the 12th century monk Simeon’s account of the removal of the shrine of St Cuthbert from Chester le Street (to the Cathedral); the Miners’ Dispute of 1892 and its resolution ...


... while the last panel reflects the pastoral scenes and rural nature of County Durham and its surroundings ... and shows how important that connection is to the wider community.


Durham Cathedral World Heritage Site - header
stained glass c/o DCWHS
How glass has kept stories alive ... the history of Durham told in one stained glass window, through its panels reflecting life through time ...

... then the fact that in the 21st century we can remove centuries old stained glass – and ship it across that pond for peoples in America to see at floor level ... I would love to travel over and experience this exhibition in LA or NYC – what an opportunity ...


... then finally the latest artistic representation of a book – beautifully coloured glass pages that reflect so clearly a need to see how each page affects us ... a modern artist creating “A Window to Nature” ... which asks us to co-produce it ...
 
Little Suns ...

He cares about our shared responsibility to the planet ... “Little Sun”  - shown in the Channel 4 video ... is a project distributing solar powered lamps to those around the world without electricity ...


One thing we still need is art ... art tells stories ... glass reminds us of our history, our artistic development ... and takes us into the future ...


Conservation and Opportunity at CanterburyCathedral – BBC Kent again this video may not work overseas .. but the J Paul Getty Museum tells all

MonumentalStained Glass – J Paul Getty Museum

Channel 4 News’ item on Celebrating Light Filled Books


Hilary Melton-Butcher

Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

76 comments:

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Those books are wild. I'd be afraid to touch them.
I've visited the Canterbury Cathedral. I can't imagine transporting any of those stained glass windows. I would not want to be the one responsible for wrapping them.

Jo said...

Absolutely fascinating. But I would be terrified to transport those windows all the way to the US. I note you mentioned Canterbury was built of sand stone. I recently saw something in a documentary about the buildings of sandstone and their likelihood of falling apart gradually. I didn't know Canterbury fell in that category.

Love the little suns. Love the books too.

J.L. Murphey said...

Wow! I'd love to see one of those books. I agree with Alex.

Suzanne Furness said...

Thanks for sharing these photos and for all the information. I am a massive fan of stained glass. But a book made of glass, wow that is new to me.

Annalisa Crawford said...

I love stained glass - especially really old glass. And those books are completely amazing.

Julia Hones said...

Glass books, how interesting, Hilary.
Life without art would not be worth living...
Hugs,
Julia

Janie Junebug said...

I wish I could travel to one of those museums.

Love,
Janie

L. Diane Wolfe said...

When we visited England in 1999, the stained glass windows in the churches were my favorite. I took so many photos because each one was unique. As you said, each one tells a story.

Betsy Brock said...

I love stained glass! Our church, which is over 100 years old recently spent the money to refurbish and repair the large stained glass windows in it. Well worth the money, I think...they are beautiful. One is a Tiffany. Love them!

Now... leather bound stained glass pages???...that is absolutely amazing!

Chatty Crone said...

I have NEVER heard of glass books - that sounds awesome. And I would be afraid to break them. They are so pretty - I love stain glass and I know it takes a lot of time and effort and they are super expensive.

Suze said...

What a worthy topic for a post, Hilary! I love the evidence of passion that goes into the selection of of the things about which you blog.

Quite enamored of the concept of little suns ...

Sue McPeak said...

Hello Blogging Friend...Isn't it nice to have cooler weather now that 'Fall' is here.   The changing season isn't the only thing happening in Blogland.  Here on CollectInTexas Gal, I've done a bit of a 'MakeOver' and added a BlogShop.   I'd like to take this opportunity to invite you over for a 'LookSee'.  Just click on the signature link below...hope to see you there.
Sue CollectInTexas BlogShop

Old Kitty said...

Elliason's glass books are sublime!! Beautiful beautiful stuff! Wish I could have one! LOL!! I am just so stunned by the Channel 4 piece I'm speechless! I so want!!! Thank you lovely Hilary! take care
x

L.G. Smith said...

Wow. So beautiful. And how scary it must be to pack those up for shipping! We have an art exhibit coming to Denver of some of the great French painters (Renoir, Monet, Degas) of the last 300 years, and I just can't imagine the stress of packing those masterpieces for safe travel.

Mike Goad said...

It's been years since I've done any stained glass. Still fascinated by it. We got started in the 70s when we saw a stained glass lamp in Mystic, Connecticut. "I can do that," I said. We currently have 3 pieces from that period -- a small window, a mirror with a stained glass peacock along it's border and a lamp -- all of them constructed using the Tiffany copper foil method.

The circles in those pieces of glass is what amazes me. Circles cut out of the middle of glass are structurally fragile. If they are not perfect, any flaw would propagate as a crack through the rest of the glass.

And shipping those old glass masterpieces. Oh...my...God! I'm sure they are spending what they have to spend to properly support and protect that fragile glass.

Maybe one of these days I'll get back to the glass. I still have one 20 year old project that needs to be finished around here somewhere.

Denise Covey said...

Amazing. I love reading the stories in glass. Ste Chapelle in Paris is my favourite. Moving about with your glossy brochure, picking out the figures and the stories...what an experience.

Denise

D.G. Hudson said...

Glass is mesmerizing when you combine color and light. I watched the video on the colored glass books. It's the transparency that I like. That's going to be one heavy book.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Alex - daunting projects all of them. Great to know you visited Canterbury ..

@ Jo - yes the sandstone is a special sort from Caen, France - it hardens over time .. but 1,000 years is a long time! Wear and tear ..

The Little Suns project sounds a fabulous idea ..

@ JL - I'd love to see a glass book too ..

@ Suzanne - it was so interesting to find out about - I guessed everyone here would enjoy seeing them ..

@ Annalisa - stained glass is intrinsic in the fabric of the British .. like you I love it

@ Julia - art comes in so many forms now-a-days ... life is interesting to find them - this was a lucky stumble!

@ Janie - perhaps you will be able to get up to NYC or LA ... I hope so.

@ Diane - I expect you had a marvellous time photographing inside and outside churches .. so pleased to read it - and they all tell their story ..

@ Betsy - Wonderful to read they've repaired your Church's windows .. and one is a Tiffany - incredible, I hadn't realised or thought about him working on a Church window ..

I'm so glad I put the fact the glass pages are bound in leather - incredible isn't it ..

@ Sandie - I just was amazed to see the tv snippet on them .. and knew I had to write about them.

@ Suze - thank you - I had wanted to do the Millennium window, but when I saw Canterbury's window panels being shipped to LA and then the glass books - just knew I had to post!!

I do enjoy what I write about .. it's for me too - as I learn as I go ..

Couldn't agree more about the Little Suns ..

@ Sue - thank you for the invite

@ Old Kitty - Yes .. I want too - so pleased you watched the Channel 4 video .. amazing isn't it ..

@ Luanne - the care that must be taken with exhibits travelling around the world, or even the country is just too much to think about - let alone the insurances, guarantees et al .. paperwork for Africa!!!

Enjoy your French artists exhibition - sounds as though it will be amazing and so interesting to be able to see ...

@ Mike - artisan workers too - what a fun project to have started .. workshops always fascinate me - though I'm fairly ham-fingered. I don't know about the Tiffany copper foil method - I'll have to find out.

Thank you for enlightening us about the cut circles ... I'd realised they'd be 'difficult' to achieve, but hadn't considered the perfection needed to produce the circles ...

I hate to think about the cost of shipping Canterbury's windows to the States and back ...

Perhaps this post has jogged your memory to look out that 20 year old project .. ?

@ Denise - there's so much that needs interpreting .. reading about you being able to walk around with your brochure and studying each window ..must have been a wonderful experience at St Chapelle, Paris ...

@ DG - so pleased you took the opportunity to see the video - and yes the colours have that different feel through the pages ...

Each of those nine books will be of some weight .. I'd love to see one.

Cheers to you all - so pleased this post has ticked the box for you! As Suze mentions .. I so enjoy what I write about ... thanks for being here .. Hilary

Murees Dupé said...

I love stained glass windows and the stories they tell. There is just something majestic about looking at them. I would have loved to see one of those glass books myself. They sound really fantastic and they definitely are original.

juliet said...

What an inspiring post this is Hilary. I love stained glass, and love seeing these windows, though I must say that the thought of them being transported makes me really nervous! The glass books look fabulous and I would love to be able to see one. Thank you. I've been away for a few days and this is a nice post to come home to.

juliet said...

P.S. I just viewed the video, which is accessible on the Channel 4 link that you give. It is fantastic!

jp said...

I heard something about glass that interested me and reading this post I wonder how it affects stain-glassed windows. Apparently glass is affected by gravity and over a considerable period of time the bottom of a pane of glass thickens as it 'oozes'down and by consequence the top thins. PS I used to live in Canterbury for a time.

Elizabeth Spann Craig/Riley Adams said...

Lovely glass! I saw the Canterbury windows in Canterbury (when I was there 20 years ago). A little nervous about them traveling! I say, let the people come to the windows!

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

I love stained glass, but never heard of glass books. As an author, this fascinates me. Maybe I'll do some research on the subject.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Murees - stained glass always tells those cobweb stories don't they -the ones over time immemorial almost .. and if I could go with you and see the glass books - I would!

@ Juliet - so glad you got to look at the Channel 4 video - the short take on seeing the books and Eliasson's ideas behind his work is a great watch and read.

I just needed to write about these .. all three stories are informative - one doesn't think of conservation opening up opportunities ... delighted you enjoyed it.

@ JP - I can't access your blog page .. so can't reciprocate .. also I've no idea re glass changing dimensions - perhaps that's why they use small coloured panes ..

@ Elizabeth - I was surprised to say the least on hearing that they were travelling to LA .. but am glad you got to Canterbury - I must go back as I haven't been for a while.

People do seem to travel to see the windows don't they .. I guess the Americans will pour in too to LA and NYC ... I'm just glad it's not me packing the crates!

@ Susan - I can't believe it's been done before - .. but enjoy your research .. hope you get a chance to look at the two videos first though ..

Thanks everyone .. Hilary

Michael Di Gesu said...

HI, Hilary,

LOVE stained glass! I am the proud owner of a window created in the early nineteenth century, but it is NOTHING like these. SO GORGEOUS!

I think it's amazing that such extreme works of art and beauty as these cathedral windows are shared with the world!

I SO HOPE I can get to see them at the Cloisters in NYC this spring. I adore the Cloisters, since I was raised in the city, I went there often on school trips. I t would be amazing to return as an adult, artist, and ART LOVER.

Thank you for bringing us such amazing British culture.... I always enjoy reading about your adventures and your culture...

loverofwords said...

Life without art would not be worth living -- love that comment! "Let there be light" and there was/is. Again, thank you for giving us a little light, Hilary.

Lynn said...

I would hate to be the one to be responsible for those windows not breaking. I'm sure there are multiple people who baby them throughout the process.

Karen Jones Gowen said...

I am fascinated by what artists can do with glass. Wonderful post, Hilary!

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

Part of the wonder of stained glass is its awe-inspiring fragile beauty. It's a little scary that those windows are going to be doing all that traveling. I guess we'll have to trust that the folks in charge of this know what they're doing, and rest assured that none of them are as klutzy as I am.

Terrific post, Hilary.

M Pax said...

Those glass books are amazing. I want one! Wow. Thanks for bringing them to my attention, Hilary. Hope your week is starting off well.

Karen Lange said...

I've always thought stained glass art was amazing. Ones from the past are particularly intriguing. I love to hear their stories, and often wonder about the story behind the artists too. Thanks so much for sharing this. It's always a treat to stop by at your place! :)

Tina said...

OMG, those books. I must see those books.
The idea of taking down those glass panels and shipping them...freaks me out. I wouldn't want to be any part of that project. Crazy to take that on, but I'm glad some Americans will get to experience some of your fabulous history.
Tina @ Life is Good

Kittie Howard said...

Oh, but I'd love to see those books! Your photos and commentary were wonderful! Canterbury Cathedral is magnificent. Years ago we stayed in a B&B, The Chaucer House, and had a room with a marble fireplace and so much from when Chaucer stayed there, an amazing experience. Love your posts Hilary!

Southpaw said...

The books are wild! I love stained glass and had a coworker once who created beautiful pieces as a hobby!

While he was learning, he got a tiny piece of glass in his eye, gack, and wore an eye patch to work for a few weeks.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Michael - how fantastic that you own a piece of early 19thC glass - must be lovely to just be with ..

So pleased you liked these - thought they might appeal to you - and great if you can get to the Cloisters next Spring. Looking forward to hearing your report back ..

@ Tasha - Julia is a pretty perceptive commenter, she has great knowledge. It's just thinking of those glass books .. and let there be light - light of many colours ... so happy you enjoyed the post.

@ Lynn - I agree the packing etc must have been so carefully thought out. But - what a treat for Californians and NYCers to see the windows ...

@ Karen - it certainly opened my eyes to new horizons .. windows to nature ..

@ Susan - I've always loved the way the sun is filtered through .. and it has, as you say, awe-inspiring beauty. Well they got to LA .. let's hope the return journey is as well done ...

@ Mary - I expect you appreciate these with your astronomical hat on .. let alone authorly hat ... I'd like to hear your thoughts ..

@ Karen - yes .. the story of the artisans working on great works of art, or great buildings - it would be wonderful to know more. So talented ...

@ Tina - well the books are in Madrid now - I wonder which Museums will get a book ...

I'd love to travel to NYC to see the Canterbury windows at The Cloisters .. but doubt it will happen.

@ Kittie - how fabulous that you actually stayed in such a Chaucerian B&B .. and saw Canterbury and its Cathedral .. memories of those times ... thanks so much ..

@ Holly - I think of you when I think of typography ... and the arts - gosh - lucky chap that the piece of glass apparently came out .. shows us we need those protective glasses at times ...

Cheers to you all - our last 'warm' day here - the Arctic cold starts coming in tomorrow .. Hilary

Gattina said...

When I was at art school I there was also a class doing stained glass. Interesting to see how they worked. What I deplore is that all these beautiful windows are mostly with religious themes. The Durham Cathedral looks like an exception.

Empty Nest Insider said...

These stained glass books are breathtaking! It's amazing how much detail goes into every page. Thanks for sharing this unique art with us Hilary.

Julie

Teresa Coltrin said...

Stain glass is wonderful. I think the stain glass books would be an awesome thing to see. I like that they look different at different times of the day.

T

Sherry Ellis said...

I've always enjoyed looking at stained glass windows. They're an artistic way of preserving history.

klahanie said...

Hi Hilary,

Such a visual delight and I have had the great privilege of seeing the Millennium Window and Durham Cathedral.

The glass books are a wonder to behold and I can see right through them. Moving such delicate items would make me a nervous wreck.

Of all the cathedrals I've visited, Durham is the one that has left me the most in awe.

Cheers,

Gary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Gattina - I'm sure being able to watch stained glass being made must have been very interesting. If stained glass is in a religious setting I have to say I'd expect it to have religious overtones .. the Millennium window charts the course of St Cuthbert and early Christianity .. as well as glorying in the past millennium ...

@ Julie - breathtaking is a good work - I'd love to see an example of the glass books .. so pleased you enjoyed it ..

@ Teresa - the colours of those pages must constantly change .. and when they're stacked on top of each other and then each is released, before having another page turned and stacked once again .. just amazing to see ...

@ Sherry - the sun beaming through stained glass is mesmerising isn't it .. and as you say stained glass windows are a clever way of preserving history ..

@ Gary - I remember you said you went up to Durham .. and that impressed ... but the glass books just amaze me - such a wonderful concept ...

I must get round to see a few more Cathedrals - spend time in them .. as I really know very little about them ... but Durham had so much to offer ..

Cheers to you all - it's still warm down here ... but tomorrow I fear not! Hilary

Susanne Drazic said...

Hi, Hilary. What a wonderfully interesting post. I think stained glass windows are beautiful. A church that we attended many years ago had stained glass windows and I enjoyed how the sun shined through them. Those glass books are fascinating. I'd be afraid to touch them, for fear they'd break when turning a page.

Mark Koopmans said...

Oh those glass books are amazing, but soooo *not* allowed in our house until the Koopmans Kids are all grown up... and perhaps not even then...seeing as I have passed on my "if it can break, it *will* break" gene.... sigh :)

Sara said...

Hilary,

This is a wonderful quote: "One thing we still need is art ... art tells stories."

I love stained glass and the stories it usually tells about a building or place where it's been living. It's an amazing craft.

The glass books were fabulous and I can't imagine how they were created. I like the "holes" in the books.

Sometimes I feel our regular books might be someday be in exhibits, given our computer age.

I still love walking into a library or a bookstore and breathing in the smell of books. It's almost better than chocolate.

I must confess, however, Kindle and Amazon do make it too easy to buy books for instant reading.

However, I still visit my local library for my fix. I check out a few books and remember what it's like to actually turn the pages:~)

Cheers to you!

Editors At Work said...

What a fascinating post, Hilary! Thanks for sharing all these. I'm absolutely staggered by the work involved in creating these.

Nas

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susanne - so pleased you enjoyed the information .. I've always loved the way stained glass works - as you obviously did in your church. Aren't the glass books amazing .. I'd be worried too - but I would love to see them.

@ Mark - oh dear .. a breaking plate household .. I'm so glad I don't have that gene! Still you can admire from a distance ...

@ Sara - 'art tells stories' in so many ways - I'd never thought about or realised. As you say stained glass is usually about the building or the time .. i.e the arts and craft movement featured a great deal ..

Again - it would be amazing to see how they created each page of glass .. let alone the circular holes - as Mike says .. so difficult to do.

Our regular books are exhibits already .. the first editions through the centuries/decades ...

But like you I prefer to feel a book as I read .. but as you mention Amazon and Kindle are too easy to avoid using ..

I don't use the local library much - but I should ...

@ Nas - many thanks - delighted you found the post fascinating .. totally staggered me too ..

Cheers to you all - the chill in the air is here .. Hilary

M. Reka said...

Stain glass is amazing.
Those glass books are so beautiful. Thanks for bringing them to my attention, Hilary. Hope your week is going off well.

warmly
marinela :)

Deniz Bevan said...

Wow, that's very brave, to export glass like that... What if something had happened to them?? I'd be scared... Can't decide if I'd like to see them in LA or England - wish I could do both!

A Lady's Life said...

I have always wanted to try making a stained glass window
I think this would be such a wild experience to have one of your own things hanging in ones window.

Stephen Tremp said...

I'm a big fan of stained colored glass windows. A picture truly does tell a thousand words.

Growing up in Michigan, there were numerous buildings with stained glass windows dating back to the 1800s and early 1900s.

Not nearly as old as in the Old World. But I remember looking at them and trying to decipher their meaning. As an adult, I can understand and appreciate them better.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Marinela - aren't the glass books wonderful .. good to see you.

@ Deniz - well it was considered very carefully with lots of insurances in place - but techniques are so advanced now-a-days .. packing and its risks must be more 'easily' assessed ... so specific care can be taken.

Well - we'd love to see you here at Canterbury!

@ A Lady's Life - creatively it would be lovely to own your own stained glass art work ..

@ Stephen - like you the stained glass of my youth always entranced me ..

I think I need to learn to interpret them better - or at least understand their symbolism and the underlying details ... but I love them though - these must be amazing to see at floor level.

Cheers to you - thanks for visiting .. Hilary

Amanda Trought said...

Hilary, I've not yet visited the cathedral yet but it is on my list! The books look amazing, I would love to get my hands on them (if only for a short while). Have a great weekend.

Cathrina Constantine said...

Stained glass windows are awesome! I'm enthralled with the old intricate windows stationed in Cathedrals around the world. We had an artist design new stained glass windows in our church recently. Very nice.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Amanda - glad to read Canterbury is on your list to visit - I really need to go too ... With your creativity I'd imagine you'd see those glass books in a very different light ..

Wet, wet weekend - by the look of it!

@ Cathrina - how wonderful to have a new stained glass window for your church. Interesting, I imagine, to see how it all came together ...

Thanks to you both .. cheers Hilary

juliet said...

Hilary, I showed my little granddaughter the video about the glass books and she was entranced!

Theresa Milstein said...

I adore stained glass. I didn't know there were stained glass books until I read this post. Amazing!

TALON said...

The beauty of stained glass is undeniable. And watching an artisan craft anything from glass fascinates me. We have a few studios in our region that produce such magnificent pieces and some of our churches have jaw-dropping stained glass windows. This was lovely, Hilary. Thank you.

cleemckenziebooks said...

The idea of the glass books is fascinating--to see ahead and behind and to sense the fragility of all you're experiencing. My heavens, that's amazing.

Beautiful images today, Hilary! These pieces of art have survived so much history when the odds were they shouldn't have done. I guess that's what make them even more precious.

Lovely, informative and exciting as always.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Juliet -- how lovely .. and I'm so pleased your granddaughter was entranced ..

@ Theresa - so glad you found it interesting .. the are amazing, I agree.

@ Talon - it is lovely to be able to watch stained glass windows being created .. the patience and precision needed. One can so easily sit and stare - just in wonderment .. so pleased you enjoyed it so much.

@ Lee - I loved your way of putting the concept of "seeing ahead and seeing behind to sense that fragility of all we're experiencing" ... not an easy thought ..

To think how long the windows from Canterbury have been around and survived history .. as you also say - does make them so precious ... it's wonderful to have your appreciative comment ..

Cheers to you all - Hilary

Val Poore said...

I can't think how I missed this post, Hilary. This is just lovely. I adore glass works and the developments in stained glass you have shown us here are a real reflection of an important part of our history. Thank you! BY the way, we have some lovely glass works here in the Netherlands too at Leerdam.

Rena George said...

I love stained glass windows, and being fortunate enough to live near York Minster I can enjoy some of the best.
Those glass books though are totally beautiful. Thank you for sharing this. Rx

Rhodesia said...

Fascinating post. I love stained glass windows and it is one of my main aims when in the many churches here to take photos of the window. I am not very good at the back light effect but occasionally I do get it right :) Have a good day Diane

Sandy said...

Stained glass windows are gorgeous. You've got some wonderful photo's there. I often like to visit the insides of old churches for just that reason; but churches are rarely open these days to be able to do that.

Oozing out my ears

Mary Montague Sikes said...

Of course, those books must be amazing! Have never seen one. The J. Paul Getty Museum is gorgeous, so I know this exhibition will be especially dramatic there.

Thank you for sharing all of this, Hilary.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Val - thanks ... I'm just delighted you're interested in the post - and the information contained in windows through the artistic skills displayed is fascinating. I'd love to visit the Netherlands properly at some stage ... and each Church has its own particular attribute or more ...

I see Leerdam's expertise lies in glass making ... with the Glass Centre ...

@ Rena - good to see you ... and yes you are lucky to live near York Minster - that must be so helpful at times - a place for reflection, encouragement and education .. amongst other things. Glad you enjoyed the glass books - I was blown away seeing them ..

@ Diane - you are so good with your photography ... and I know you'll persevere to get it right ...

I have some very funny photos to put up of some art - when I can get my head into writing up the posts .. I really need to take a photographic course ...

@ Sandy - the photos came from professional sources, but I'm grateful to use them to explain the post ... and show off talent from 900 years ago, and then those of today ...

Sadly many historical places are locked up for security reasons - very distressing that people can be so destructive ... stealing, destroying, vandalising etc etc

@ Monti - with your artistic talent - I imagine you'd be immersed in the art of stained glass ... that's lovely to know you've seen the J Paul Getty Museum - must be amazing ..

Pleasure just so happy everyone has enjoyed this post .. cheers Hilary

mail4rosey said...

I would be so scared to transport them too. What a lovely and unique idea though. I bet those glass books are quite the sight!!!

Southpaw said...

Hilary, apparently he "was" wearing glasses, but tipped them down or up for some reason. He need those lab goggles. Or maybe he would have tipped those too.

You comment on type is timely. My post next week is about web fonts.

Connie Arnold said...

Stained glass windows are so beautiful, as your pictures well show. I was privileged to sing with my church choir at Canterbury Cathedral when we were there several years ago and loved all the cathedrals we visited and their lovely windows. Thank you for another fascinating and informative post, Hilary!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Rosey - the windows seem to have been repaired and exhibited around the Cathedral, but packing them up for an overseas trip - seems incredible - thankfully all is well.

@ Holly - I can't remember what I said about type ... but I'll check out when you post about web fonts next week ..

@ Connie - what a treat to be able to sing in Canterbury Cathedral with your choir .. and then have a tour of Cathedrals too - lovely thought. Good to see you ..

Thanks everyone - cheers Hilary

Pat Hatt said...

The windows i would surely break, no transporting for me, I'll just watch at your sea.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Pat .. cheers Hilary

Al Diaz said...

Hi Hilary! I've come to ask you to drop by the cave. There is an important invitation there with your name on it. You're in my Guests of Honor list and it would be really great if you could join me in a celebration on the appointed date. I leave you lots of Dragon Hugs!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Al .. I've been over to your cave - appreciate the thought .. and see you on the 24th ...also appreciate the dragon hugs! Cheers Hilary

Kquotes Com said...

Those books are wild. I'd be afraid to touch them.
I've visited the Canterbury Cathedral. I can't imagine transporting any of those stained glass windows. I would not want to be the one responsible for wrapping them. http://kquotes.com/

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks for coming by Kquotes ... I'm glad you enjoyed the post. Canterbury is amazing isn't it ... lovely Cathedral. Yes - the detail that must have gone into the planning for their display overseas must have been daunting ...

Cheers Hilary