Sunday, 12 May 2013

British Food ... the Way We Eat Now – Happy Mother’s Day ...



While I was writing my A – Z posts on Aspects of British Cookery, this nation of gourmets celebrates the joy of fine food.


Apparently London is the world’s most exciting gastronomic city ... it is hard to believe just how gastronomically astute we have become since the grey, beigy wartime rations we’d been used to eating.



Only a few decades ago ... tourist budget Britons started to branch out to travel and trade across Europe, then further afield ... our palates grew more adventurous and much more discerning.

 
Garlic and Onion sellers
peddling the streets of London
Mediterranean produce appeared in market stalls, on station barrows, village stores got edged out with the introduction of small supermarkets, they expanded to become big supermarkets, which e-x-p-a-n-d-e-d even more to hypermarkets ...



The yellow curry or orange sweet and sour pork offered in those early Indian or Chinese restaurants or takeaways, became more upmarket, spices and herbs started to appear in our shops ...



... again we were informed how to make new delicacies ... the British cook was once again being educated ... and asked to expand our culinary horizons ...

 
by Jenny Linford - available
at The London Bookshop
... cookbooks are still bought, recipes in newspapers and magazines included ingredients that three decades ago would have been unheard of here ...


... this melting pot of a nation – a nation rich in cultures ... demanded foods from around the world ... so a Jamaican could make Curry Goat, a Filipino could make Tamarind Sinigang, a South African could have his boerwors, we could all try our hand at making Japanese Sushi ...


So much has happened to awaken our taste buds ... we demand to know where the coffee came from, where the salt was sourced, and which type of pepper is on offer ...


We have such a diverse range of peoples ... you can find Brazilian foods, Polish stores, Scandinavian dishes ... all within the range of a town or city near you ... if not deliverable by a white van man ... then certainly available to be ordered from a shop near you ...




Cornish Anemones reminding me
of my mother

Then what is even more strange, to me anyway ... is that an enterprising British-Indian young man from Bradford is opening a fish and chip shop in the Indian sub-continent, not even on the coast!


It’s a funny old world – but a fun one ... a very happy Mother’s Day to all families – to all women ... we are all carers in some way or other ...

I'm doing a double dose today and can be found on the Blogging from A to Z Challenge site here.



Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

77 comments:

J.L. Murphey said...

As the survivors of WWII die off, wouldn't you expect change? What surprises me is not the young man opening a chip shop, it's that it hasn't been done before.

Suzanne Furness said...

A funny old world indeed, Hilary! It is amazing how culinary tastes have changed in a relatively short time. I remember the first time I had spaghetti bolognase at a friend's house I was probably about 9 or 10 years old. My family never ate food like that and I remember my slight horror staring at the plate wondering what it was! Now the same meal is one of our family favourites. We have access to a much more varied and interesting diet now and I am thankful for that.

Munir said...

Thank you Hilary for yet an other interesting and informative post.
Thank you also for your warm wishes to all of us.

jabblog said...

So much choice - it's wonderful and sometimes confusing:-)

JoJo said...

It's good to know that England has branched out, food-wise. When I went on a school trip in 1982, the food was so bland and awful that I lost weight on the trip. I think all I ate was flake bars, lion bars and orange quash.

Val Poore said...

Well, now you've amazed me, Hilary. London as the most exciting gastronomic city? Whoever would have thought it, but then reading your post, I can now understand why! It's mother's day here too :-)

Manzanita said...

It's good to learn of all the varied food choices. I used to visit London quite often and I went straight to the Indian food. I love the curries and spicy taste and it's hard to find in my neck of the woods.

Jo said...

I would disagree with you about the 3 decades Hilary, I think it was much more than that. Things were creeping in to our food markets much sooner after the war than that, I remember when garlic first appeared and bananas which we hadn't seen during the war. Lots of herbs and spices came in way before I left England and that was about 40 years ago. I am not disputing there has been a big change in the last 30 years, but I think it began long before that.

L.G. Smith said...

Yep, I even saw a Mexican restaurant while in London. :)

TALON said...

Hilary, I watched a mini-series that Jamie Oliver did on the history of British food...and it was fascinating to find out where the idea for fish and chips came and other foods that were considered British staples. Yes, it's a funny old world indeed!

Wishing all Moms and caretakers a very Happy Mothers Day!

Tina said...

Another wonderful history lesson! I'd love some garlic from that cart...love garlic - you can't have too much, in my opinion.
Thanks for guesting at the A-Z today. You're getting some very nice response.
I'm thinking of you today as you miss your mom.
http://positiveletters.blogspot.co.uk/2013/05/british-food-way-we-eat-now-happy.html

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ JL - I agree change carries on regardless .. it was the Fish and Chip shop in the middle of India that amused me .. and that continent is not completely westernised.

@ Suzanne - oh gosh .. my first spaghetti was out of a tin = revolting! I can quite believe you'd have wondered what on earth were those worms! ... and now as you say pasta is normal family fare. Yes I love our choices ...

@ Munir - glad you enjoyed the posts and Mother's Day thoughts ..

@ Janice - yes, I get muddled at times ... I'm not very good with Asian flavours - I don't know enough about their cuisine.

@ JoJo - I remember your British school trip .. well at least you had flake bars, lion bars and orange squash ... glad you've tried our squash.

@ Val - yes that's what the papers say, as do others - so I guess it's as true as it can be ...

Do the Europeans celebrate Mother's Day today .. I wasn't sure ... so went the American route!

@ Manzanita - the foods have changed so much over the years .. and I love it that you 'hit' London and went straight for the Indian food ... I prefer the 'quieter' flavoured ones now .. but in the old days my mother and I ate hot hot ones! Perhaps you could conjure up your own .. ?

@ Jo - you may disagree .. but I think I was inferring there was a wave of new produce coming in in those early decades after the war, before 3 - 4 decades ago .. the general much larger range we have today started to come in ... and I lived in the countryside - things took longer to spread out ...

@ LG - just about every type of cuisine is available ... Mexican as well ...

@ Talon - I think I missed that series - but picked up parts of it ... our history is as strange as our food history .. it comes from all over the place ... potatoes came from South-Middle America - which we forget so often.

@ Tina - it's good to remember how much we've adopted and adapted our culinary likes and dislikes - in a relatively short space of time .. I've eased back on garlic today - but certainly flavoured my food liberally for many years!

Thank you re the note on my mother - yes the memories are around ..

Cheers to you all - Happy Mother's Day .. Hilary

Milo James Fowler said...

Melting pot -- or salad bowl? We're looking forward to the new Mexican restaurant opening up down the street, but my wife and I have made a pact: We have to walk it. Otherwise, it'll be too easy to gain 50 pounds in a month.

Julia Hones said...

You are right. London has come a long way in terms of food variety; it is a reflection of its cultural diversity. I like all the pictures you are sharing. Happy Mother's Day, Hilary.

Gattina said...

In Germany it was the same ! Now you find every kind of food of the whole world in Berlin or other big towns.
I am not yet that old that I remember war times, lol !
Anyway the best Chinese food I ever ate was in London's China town !
In Brussels too you can have everything. I'll probably be in Eastbourne in July, date is not yet fixed ! Hope the sun is shining by then !

rosaria williams said...

Ah, we are all learning from each other, and still looking for anything new and delectable to all the senses.

Inger said...

I see the same thing happening in Sweden, it has become so international with things in the supermarkets that I had never seen before, nor had any idea of what they may be. I do remember London in 1960, not very interesting as far as food went. Thanks for this fun post.

Lynn said...

The one thing I didn't think I got enough of in the UK was greens, but that was about 15 years ago. I do remember having some good hummus.

Janie Junebug said...

I've always heard that British food is terrible and that everything is boiled. You've given me hope for eating decently when I make my longed-for trip to England.

Love,
Janie

Donna Hole said...

"gastronomic" what an awesome word.

Happy Mothers Day to you too Hilary.

....dhole

Maggie Winter said...

Well I personally love British food and before I sold up and left the UK I won Pub of the year by serving the very best of British. In Brazil foods from around the world have yet to land here, most things are hard to find if at all and so expensive, I shop in UK and bring it all back with me like the sad expat I am as I still cook British. Last night we had steak and kidney pud, homemade with suet pastry (I bring my atora with me). Tonight my husband and little boy will make a traditional roast for dinner. Love your blog but makes me miss home so and I really miss the chippy. See you soon:)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Milo - are you here in England ?.. I get excited when new restaurants open in Eastbourne! I think you might be right - we need to walk more ..

@ Julia - London is an incredible melting pot .. thanks re the pictures: I try to select ones that relate or interest me re the post ..

@ Gattina - I'm sure you've experienced the similar changes I have (and nor did I experience War times) .. it'll be good to meet up in July when you're here .. let me know ..

@ Rosaria - we still do don't we .. as long as it tastes delicious .. it's ok!

@ Inger - I'm sure now - and England must have had very bland food in the 60s .. but we've improved!! It's interesting to look back though .. as you note ..

@ Lynn - I think they were there, but probably not offered in restaurants ... fresh from the garden is the best!

@ Janie - oh dear .. well this refutes that thought?! Enjoy your visit when you get here .. contact me!

@ Donna - well we are the home of English language aren't we?! It is a great word isn't it ..

@ Maggie - do your really 'import' food to Brazil?! I'm amazed .. but it opens other thoughts ....

Wonderful you're still using basic English ingredients .. so good and your family are so lucky!

Thanks so much .. I love looking around Brazil via your blog ..

Cheers everyone .. thanks so much - foods are fun to learn about .. Hilary

Elise Fallson said...

I'm a fan of the far east flavor and spices. And I think diversity is what makes a country's gastronomy so rich and wonderful. But nonetheless, I'll still be happy with a simple side of Fish n Chips. (: Happy Mother's Day!

Susanne Drazic said...

Interesting post. I think it would be wonderful walking the streets checking out all the culinary delights.

klahanie said...

Hi Hilary,

Indeed, a wide variety of food offerings can be found in London. Some fabulous culinary experiences to be had.

Aha, you are on the alphabet challenge site. Wonder where I'm going next....

Hope you had some semblance of decent weather over the weekend.

Gary

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

I'm halfway across the globe, Hilary, and you've awaken my taste buds~!

Mark Means said...

Just another reason I need to get to London...the food sounds awesome!

Even though we 'seem' to get international flavor over here in the States, a lot of times it gets "Americanized" and doesn't resemble the original taste, at all.

Denise Covey said...

Hi Hilary. Even when I first visited London 9 years ago, the pickings were slim. On subsequent visits, it's been much better...especially the Asian restaurants when you find a good one. Happy Mother's Day to you. I thought the Brits celebrated MD at a different time to Aussies, but obviously not. I had a great day!!!

Denise

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Elise .. if I was in France I'd be in heaven! Love their food .. but Asian and spice just add a little something ..

@ Susanne - there are some very good restaurants all over the UK now - while we can make such a range of food from all the produce that comes in from around the world ..

@ Gary - the taste buds do wake up when I wander around London, then I get on the train and come home!

@ Joylene - these time differences can be troublesome at times, especially when one is hungry!

@ Mark - London will bowl you over, let alone the ethnic restaurants available .. yes food that's purported to be 'true' often is 'tuned up' for local tastes .. not very good for my palate either ..

@ Denise - I think you need to know where to go .. when you're travelling that's not always easy.

We do celebrate Mothering Sunday, as part of the Christian calendar, before Easter ... but as I was guesting over at the Challenge site I opted to finish my food posts off here ... hence two Mother's Day posts ..

Cheers to you all .. we have Arctic air about to hit us once again .. !! Have good weeks - Hilary

Trisha F said...

Gosh I love food. And I love living in a multicultural place where you can try almost any type!

Tara Tyler said...

i caught up on your last three posts, whew! lots of love here!
first i appreciate your a to z, and am glad we met last year thru it! and will be visiting amanda by your leave. (did i use that phrase properly?)

and ebert. i remember watching siskel & ebert every week as a kid. loved their movie reviews! he voices what bloggers already know in an eloquent, passionate way. i didnt know his last days were so distraught! so glad he found this outlet!

and happy mothers day! thanks for all your foodie fun info! its been a pleasure knowing you! heres to more & meeting someday!

Laura Eno said...

London has indeed become quite eclectic since the war. I haven't been there in so long. I'd love to come back and spend some time.

Teresa Coltrin said...

I realized this weekend in St. Louis and Mother's Day at my mom's house that food is a way to be socialable as well as it just tastes good.

Jarm Del Boccio said...

Wish I would have found you during the challenge. What a great topic. I've always wanted to live in London. . .now I can do it vicariously!

mail4rosey said...

When we went to London everyone warned us that the food would be blah, but my husband found that not to be true at all and we loved every dish we had, at every place we went!

Visiting today because Manzanita gave you such a nice shout out over at her place. :)

loverofwords said...

Hilary: First, Mother's day wishes to your mom, I know you take care of her. I remember talking with a friend who was doing the same and this is what she said when I said that it must be hard. "It's a privilege, Natalie." WOW! Thank you for visiting my blog post A-Z. Now I am visiting your blog everyday with my morning cup of coffee. Jamie Oliver, what a sweetheart for coming to America and trying to improve our kid's eating habits.

~Sia McKye~ said...

I love exploring new foods and spices. One of my prized cookbooks is one with recipes from around the world.

A co-worker of my husband made us some Filipino egg rolls. A huge batch. They're quite good.

When I lived in California, I would provide the chicken and I had a Fiji family that would make me curry--it was soooo good. No matter how I try I can't match it.

Love the Anemones! So beautiful.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Trisha - I'd love to live back in London with sufficient dough in the pocket!

@ Tara - we did meet last year .. and I'm honoured you've been doing some back-reading ... and that you'll be calling in on Amanda - she's an amazing lady.

It's usually co-joined into one phrase .. "Without so much as a by your leave" ... rather than just using the 'by your leave' ...

So: without so much as a by your leave, I shall visit Amanda ...

Might be easier on the ear .. my English is not brilliant!

I loved the way Ebert's words came over - so relevant to us bloggers ..

Thanks for your thoughts Tara and I'll be seeing you too ..

@ Laura - well we'd love to see you in London .. and I'll be here I expect!

@ Teresa - how lovely you were able to visit your mother, enjoy her food, share her table and be sociable and happy on Mother's Day ..

@ Jarm - you may enjoy your London and British visits vicariously .. my posts are pretty eclectic!

@ Rosey - congratulations on your baby granddaughter ... wonderful you found some good restaurants and enjoyed yourself in London town .. thanks re tipping me off about Manzanita's post ...

@ Natalie - that teaches me .. I need to update my profile! Sadly my mother died last July - and I did visit her everyday once or twice ...

It is a privilege and we learn so much, and benefit everyone from being around and interacting ..

We did meet last year - but for some reason you dropped off the radar - as you say we're connected now ... and Jamie Oliver does do some wondrous things for food and improving our health ...

@ Sia - so do I .. and would join you any day.

Wonderful to have someone cook you delicious dishes - the egg rolls sound rather nice!

Fijian curry, I imagine, would be extra special - lucky you once again ... sorry you can't quite seem to match their dish - sad!

Thanks re the anemones - I love them .. they make my heart sing when I see them ..


Cheers to you all and thanks so much for calling in - Hilary

Susan Oloier said...

I had no idea that the culinary tastes in Britain were so varied and diverse. We in the USA hear so much about other areas of Europe when it comes to food that many of us don't think of Britain this way. Great and informative post for me.

Poke The Rock said...

it is great that there is a big variety of food now. I know back in the GDR we didn't have that much choice...especially meat wise. But now my mother is in heaven, maybe that explains why she has so many meat dishes...

Friko said...

You cannot imagine how different things are now from what they were when I first came here in the 60s.No comparison.

We used to laugh about English stodge. Opening up to the world has certainly made a huge difference.

Nick Wilford said...

Things have certainly been enriched by letting in other cultures' culinary delights!

M Pax said...

Yay for new things to eat. Our horizons have been expanded throughout the states, too. Here in the middle of nowhere I can make Thai dishes. Yum.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susan - we just collect people, and they bring their food, and the Brits make their own ... let alone our original roast beef et al

@ PTK - I quite understand the Eastern Block did not provide many extras .. life would have been very hard.

@ Friko - I'd love to hear your stories of the English in the 60s .. and their culinary skills or not ..

English stodge is making a come back isn't it .. yet we can buy produce from around the world and satisfy all tastes .. looking back I can laugh with you.

@ Nick - you're in a city with many cultures, tastes and flavours aren't you ... Glasgow.

@ Mary - yes it is wonderful to be able to choose and have that selection available ... wonderful you can make Thai dishes - sounds good.

Cheers to you all - food seems to bring us much cheer! Hilary

juliet said...

It's the same here in NZ Hilary: we have food choices now that we would never have dreamed of; lots of Asian and Polynesian food as well as European, South American etc. You must be missing your dear mum on Mother's Day, so a special thought for you.

Clarissa Draper said...

I love it when you can find so many different ingredients. Canada is like that too, you can find almost anything to eat. Here in Mexico, it's more difficult. Most people like Mexican food and it's all they eat.

Kittie Howard said...

Thank you for this lovely post. We have British friends who are blessed that at least one parent from the WWII era is still alive. I've listened to their stories with rapt attention. The enormous challenges England overcame to thwart Hitler are inspirational to those everywhere who value their freedoms.

But, the challenges were so enormous I sometimes think how the ordinary Brit survived fades into this enormity. Food was scarce; people had to make do. Post-war England had to re-build, with resources diverted more toward starting over than to exploring food options. This took time. . . through the years, I've also enjoyed the culinary expansions. But *sighs* I long for the old fish and chips wrapped in yesterday's newspaper.

(I'll post later about results from the path for e-pubbing!)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Juliet - your food choices must be wonderful .. Polynesian foods I really fancy trying..

And yes .. I do miss my mother - but we had a long life together and for that I count my blessings ...

@ Clarissa - I'd guess the same for Canada, especially the larger cities and towns ... but Mexico - ok I think I can understand that ... love their food, but all the time I'm not so sure ..

@ Kittie - yes there are so many stories from the War days that we need to hear about ... my mother has cousins, so I still get some snippets from them - yet they're far away. You are quite right - I don't think this generation, or those who are on a different continent realised how incredibly challenging both wars were - and how lucky the world is .. that the little old Englanders hung on and won out ...

I was born after the War but our parents grew their own food and I guess bartered a lot more ...

I remember the family getting a Kenwood mixer ... and various other gadgets along the way - gave us new ideas to try ... and then a daughter branches out and so parents try new things ... though in fact my father's one and only favourite restaurant was a Greek restaurant ... certainly I followed that trend, as did my mother.

However the trips to Cornwall and being able to stop at the fishy on arrival and get that old fish and chips wrapped in yesterday's newspaper ... loved the F&C that way .. with vinegar and some salt ...

Cheers to you three and thanks for the interesting comments - Hilary

Jen Forbes said...

I think as our countries and cities become diverse so do our taste buds! Great article, I do love garlic and onions and use them each and every day. And I do so enjoy food from different countries, such wonderful variety~
Hope your Mothers Day was lovely!

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

Huh! I could've SWORN I already left a comment on this post. (Good thing I didn't put any money on it!)

Growing up in Baltimore, which was a primary entry port for European immigrants for many years, I was surrounded by ethnic neighborhoods, and had easy access to authentic ethnic foods, so it was a rude awakening when we moved to Georgia in '71. Back then, there was little diversity. But NOW, we have immigrants from all over the world, and fabulous international markets and restaurants to please our palates. (And my palate is VERY happy about it!)

Madeleine Sara said...

I can't eat curries or chillies or peppers because I'm allergic to Capsaicin!
AND supermarkets provide so much more variety now than when I was a teenager, too. :O)

michelle said...

The world's most exciting gastronomic city? Wow.
It does make sense though because, to my knowledge, London is one of the most cosmopolitan cities, boasting a melting pot of cultures...
... and don't forget that Jamie Oliver is British too... and he has certainly contributed to the gastronomical revolution!

Bethie said...

Sounds like London's ready for some Cajun cooking. Do ya'll make gumbo yet? Good eating.
Thanks for visiting my little corner of the internet.

Empty Nest Insider said...

I wish I knew you when we visited London almost twenty six years ago! You would have told us about the best restaurants, and places to go.

Julie

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Jen - we do seem to be losing some of the individuality in life in general .. but I hope we retain our own culinary traditions, with all the extras we delight in ...

@ Susan - I do that, so no worries - always lovely to see you.

I know little about Baltimore -except for its huge port size and the links across the Atlantic. Moving out of a big city does throw up a few differences doesn't it ... I'd love to be back in London - but the South Coast will do, though I crave the foods of London sometimes. Like you I thoroughly enjoy international flavours .. and am grateful I can satisfy my taste buds occasionally ...

@ Madeleine - the dreaded Capsaicin -- at least there are plenty of other foods you can eat .. and as you say so much variety.

@ Michelle - I know it surprised me to read the article .. and we are a complete melting pot of nationalities .. and once again Jamie Oliver is recognised as a British culinary brand!

@ Bethie - yes we even have Cajun foods and restaurants .. and Gumbo is quite often made ... I love it - though I've yet to make the south of the States - it's on my list!

@ Julie - you need to live there and then there's so much choice - certainly restaurants and places of interest have both greatly improved: I wish I was an expert in those aspects!

Cheers to you all from a very wet and cold England - Hilary

Theresa Milstein said...

I love that food has become so international. We have options that didn't exist 20-30 years ago.

Sandy said...

Nice to hear Britain is expanding with regard to food, for years it seemed to be known not for good food. My DD's best friend in HS's mother was from England and said how she liked to visit her mother, but was always happy to return because the food was sooo bland. The melting pot though sure makes sense. LOVE the beautiful flowers, I've not heard that particular type, and need to see if they're available here. Such color!
May Challenge

Stephen Tremp said...

Being so close to France its amazing how different the foods are. I think England being an island has been a bit isolated over the centuries when it comes to food. Glad to hear they are branching out.

I'll stop by the A to Z and say hello!

Roland D. Yeomans said...

The world keeps changing all around us from food to clothes to terror on the streets. I get light-headed sometimes! :-)

Robyn Campbell said...

Hey Hil! What a wonderful post. Food brings people together. Love the Anemones. They are beautiful! The fish and chip shop in the Indian sub-continent just proves that it really IS a small, small world. Hugs and loves.

Christine Rains said...

I wish my palette had been better educated when I was younger. So many great foods out there. Have a wonderful week! :)

deborahjbarker said...

I have my mother-in-law staying with us for a couple of weeks. She is a great cook and loves cookery books. She watches every cookery programme going - except those chefs to whom she has taken a dislike (the ones who swear I think). When my mother stays with us it is murder mystery programmes all the way so cookery makes a pleasant change and I really enjoyed Masterchef this year :-)

Morgan said...

You have the coolest posts, Hilary! I always enjoy learning something new!!!!

Sherry Ellis said...

It's fun to sample food from different countries. It's nice that you live in such a melting pot where you can do that!

Sherry Ellis said...

It's fun to sample food from different countries. It's nice that you live in such a melting pot where you can do that!

walk2write said...

It's lovely, Ms. Hilary, that your country has embraced new cultures and their many flavors. When I met my husband, we were both attending a university with many international students. One of our favorite events to attend was the annual international food festival on campus. Having grown up in a small Midwestern town, he had never tried some of the foods we sampled. It took him a while to come around to liking new tastes, but now he's game for just about anything. I believe that breaking bread together with other cultures is one of the best ways to break down cultural barriers and find common ground.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Theresa - I totally agree with you and I love trying new flavours ..

@ Sandy - we had to get used to change and the introduction of new flavours, herbs, spices et .. but we're now pretty good.

Aren't the anemones just beautiful - my mother's favourite and we relate to them as Cornish!

@ Stephen - it is surprising how different we are - but the continent is one big place, and we have a different climate and geology .. now we're remembering our local roots and recipes, I'm pleased to say.

Thanks for popping over to the A-Z and leaving a comment ..

@ Roland .- it’s terrible isn’t it .. food poverty, clothes factory destruction and poverty, and then killing on our doorstep ... what to do ? Like you – I just am very unhappy ..

@ Robyn .. food always brings us together doesn’t it .. and the anemones – so glad you loved seeing them here ... and Fish and Chips in the Indian sub-continent, who would have believed it .. so good to see you and hope things are easier – hugs and love back across the pond ..

@ Christine – I’m glad I had grandparents who had travelled, and so had children who were prepared to try things and then pass that love of food on to us ... I can understand the way you feel – I consider myself lucky ...

@ Deborah – I have lots of my mother’s cookery books here now ... but I’m not sure if she watched many cookery programmes – possibly .... I do occasionally – I’m glad the Hackney youngster won MasterChef this year .. the Murder Mysteries are easy going .. thankfully when my mother was ill she would watch what I put on and usually nothing else – good sports programmes, some country programmes .. but she watched ... and the annual events – Chelsea, Royal Events, etc etc ..if I’d been subjected to tv all day ... I’d have been off my rocker!

@ Morgan – thank you so much – I try to make them interesting ..

@ Sherry – it is so interesting to try new foods from around the world .. and I’ve always tended to do so ...

@ Walk2Write – many thanks .. those kind of cultural-food events you talk about are the best aren’t they .. and I’m so pleased your husband now just enjoys his food . I couldn’t agree more about how food and getting together can break down cultural barriers and find that common ground ...

Thanks everyone so much – love your visits ... cheers Hilary

Karen Lange said...

I am now kind of hungry...go figure! :) Thanks, Hilary, as always, for sharing an informative post.

Hope you have a good weekend!

The Golden Eagle said...

London sounds like a good place for food. You've made me want to visit it, just to check out the meals. :)

Romance Book Haven said...

Some cuisines are terribly exotic and other quite nondescript. I once asked a Danish man what Danish food was like and he said he didn't know. Maybe it was just him, though. I've heard great reports about Danish butter cookies and smorgasbord.

Editors At Work said...

There's nothing like a nice plate of fish and chips, no matter what exotic food is available.

Judy Croome | @judy_croome said...

There is nothing - nothing - quite like British fish & chips! Thank Heavens a couple from Brighton have opened a restaurant in Rosebank that sells "proper" British fish & chips - I have to make a real effort to stop myself going there every week!! :)

Amanda Trought said...

Hilary It is nice to have so much diversity and see how many of the herbs and spices have crossed into different foods. I have brought many a cook book to try out different dishes, then after a while I like to experiment futher with different dishe to add my own spin on it.

Ornery's Wife said...

Wow! Look at all your comments! This was a great post and so informative.

When Ornery went to Farnbrough a few years ago he talked about how expensive everything was there--food especially. He dined on many very small salads to keep within his per-diam. He also mentioned that there was not a lot of flavor to the dishes--of course his wife cooks a lot of Mexican food!

tm

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Karen - I hardly dare look at the post .. as I'm rather hungry now and need to go out first before supper comes around .. so Go Figure too!

@ GE - well I hope you'll get to visit London sometime soon - it's a young person's city ... lots of vibes ..

@ Romance Book Haven - it when you get such a mix - it is difficult .. and I see bacon was forgotten. Danish butter cookies - are good! I love smorgasbord ..

@ Nas - fish and chips ... just sometimes that's all we need isn't it ...

@ Judy - I must check with Laurel when she comes over - as I'm sure she'll have been to that fish and chip shop - I used to love the cinema there ..

@ Amanda - you're in the thick of it .. I'd love to live back in London now .. but we can get everything wherever we live - and one day I'd love to try some of your home cooking - I bet it is good!

@ TM - well the post gets left up for a while .. I can't write that often .. well I could, but I don't!

So pleased you enjoyed the food - if Ornery was at Farnborough Air Show, which I think he might have been, then it was catering for all the Air Attaches etc .. diplomats have big pockets - well their governments do. Well he was pleased to come home! We don't over spice our food, but certainly enjoy our flavours ...

Thanks so much - so good to see you all .. cheers Hilary

Lisa said...

And this goes so against what most, Americans anyway, think of "British food!" Personally, I've always had a great time eating in the UK. I hope you too, enjoyed mother's day!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Lisa .. well I hope so - certainly the food I like and eat is delicious!

So pleased you've had good food times here ... we try!

Thank you I had a peaceful day .. but I hope you were blessed ... cheers Hilary